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Web API

The new Web API feature enables users to control Titan via simple HTTP commands.
Get the full programming power of Titan, but leave a simple to use interface or trigger commands with other inputs, like tide sensors at the New Dawn install shown below.

This video shows you how to set up the Web API function:


You can also find some useful links to the Web API documentation website, which lists all of the functions you can call, as well as the manual, some examples/code templates and a case study on New Dawn at the Houses of Parliament.

Web API Documentation Website - follow this link to access the Web API documentation website, which lists all of the functions you can call.

You can also find a Web API specific forum HERE.

All these support materials are available to use free of charge. If you require further support we offer half a day with one of our software developers to create code and help with your project for £400 + VAT. For further details, please contact sales@avolites.com.

Name Description Modified Date Size  
Web API Examples and Code Templates
02/02/2017 6.6 MB Download
Web API Manual
02/02/2017 2.5 MB Download

New Dawn at the Houses of Parliament

New Dawn provided a unique challenge: A lighting installation controlled by the tide!



Mary Branson worked with a team of artists, craftspeople, engineers and technicians to realise her vision for 'New Dawn'. Over the course of a year, these specialists helped turn the artist’s concept into a reality.

New Dawn provided a unique challenge: A lighting installation controlled by the tide! To realise this the information from tide sensors on Tower Bridge is drawn down by computers at the Houses of Parliament, which then send commands to trigger the Quartz console via Titan’s new Web API support.

On the programming side Chris Wilson of WLX built cue lists for different tidal levels, including use of the generative pixel mapper effects, which were triggered by different web commands.

Chris Wilson of WLX productions said “I chose Avolites for this project because I knew it was something out of the ordinary.  The support from the Avolites team has been fantastic, allowing for seamless integration with an existing IT system, and the realisation of a beautiful work of art.”

 

'New Dawn' technical drawing (Photo: Musson Engineering Ltd)


Making 'New Dawn'

Mary Branson worked with a team of artists, craftspeople, engineers and technicians to realise her vision for 'New Dawn'. Over the course of a year, these specialists helped turn the artist’s concept into a reality.

 

Glasswork

To create the glass scrolls that are so central to 'New Dawn', Branson enlisted the skills of leading studio glass artist Adam Aaronson. Of varying sizes and colours, all 168 unique glass discs were hand-blown and carefully ‘spun’ to flatten them. To produce the scroll pattern, Aaronson applied powdered glass colours and silver leaf to the molten glass at specific points in the process.


Testing the light sheets (Photo: Mat Clark)

Metalwork

Branson placed the engineering of her sculpture's portcullis-like framework in the hands of father and son team Ian and Colin Musson. Experts in designing unusual and bespoke metalwork, Musson Engineering employed specialist contractors to produce the structure using stainless steel and aluminium.

Lighting

Designed by Chris Wilson, WLX Productions, New Dawn’s glass scrolls are lit by computer-controlled Applelec LED light sheets. Programmed by the artist, and linked to tidal monitoring of the Thames, a continuous series of slow transitions build from low tide, where only one disc is lit, to high tide, where the whole piece is illuminated. Within these transitions, selections of suffrage society colours emerge and then fade back into the rhythm of the artwork.

Chris Wilson, WLX Productions Ltd, during temporary warehouse installation, Winter 2015 (Photo: Mat Clark)

"The sculpture uses light and colour to radiate a bold, positive energy illuminating this space unlike any other area within the Palace of Westminster."
Mary Branson

Installation

"From my first notebook sketch on the train, two years later - there it was. It was - big, strong and beautiful."
Mary Branson

Click here to read the full story

https://www.avolites.com/hh